Giving – Matthew 6:1-4 & 6:19-21 – Sermon Notes

Christians should be characterised by generosity, with their love and with their money. They’re called to imitate Jesus, who gave up his very life.

Don’t give to impress others

People often give to charities publicly so that people will think they’re generous. Jesus says we should be interested in pleasing God, not people. We should be giving in secret. Don’t we all live much of our lives trying to impress others? The temptation is to try to show off with our money. Christians should do all that we do to be seen by the Lord God. It is okay to talk to other Christians about our giving. Sometimes we like to use this as an excuse to be selfish and to not be accountable. The point that Jesus is making is that we should always do it for God, not to impress others.

Give generously to show your love for God and his church

Old Testament tithing is a good starting point, but the New Testament talks about generosity. That is the pattern we should follow – extravagant generosity. We are to have faith that the Lord will provide. Jesus says in v19 not to store up treasure on earth, but in heaven. That is the truth that shaped the widow who gave all the she had. It’s to shape all Christians in all contexts and in all situations.

Give generously to grow your love for God and his church

The very act of giving is what we grow our love for God and his church. If you give generously to your church, you will see your love grow for the people there. It might mean not having holidays you want, or the car you want. As we give generously we are depending on God, not on our savings. Do you rely on Jesus more than on money? If so, you’ll be a generous giver, because you’re living more for heaven than on earth.

Prayer – Matthew 6:5-18 – Sermon Notes

There is a chasm between us and God but the gospel is good news. Jesus bridges that gap. We can be forgiven and become friends with God.

“I have come that they may have life, and have it to the full.”

“Whoever wants to be my disciple must deny themselves, take up their cross and follow me.”

All relationships are costly. Following Jesus is costly. Real relationships are worth the cost. Following Jesus is about a relationship with the God of the whole earth and is always worth the cost.

Fast because you depend on Jesus

We should fast and pray. Fasting is choosing to go without something. Is it something that we don’t really do? The New Testament assumes that we fast. The Bible talks about fasting as a way of deepening your relationship with God. Jesus says “when you fast”, not “if you fast”. He says to do it in secret, and it doesn’t have to be food. Do I really depend on Jesus for all my life?

Fast to train yourself

If you can fast and resist the temptation, you are disciplining yourself to say no.

Fast so that you can pray

The point of fasting is so that instead of eating (or whatever it is), you use the time to pray. Praying is talking to God. All Christians should pray.

Pray because you love Jesus

We pray because we love Jesus. We don’t have to worry about the right words to say. There are examples of how to pray, but we can talk to God in any way we wish. If we never talk to God what does that say about our relationship with him?

Pray because you need Jesus

We think we can get through the day on our own. The way we live and the way we pray can show that we don’t need Jesus. We can pray for others, but secretly think we don’t need Jesus’ help ourselves.

Pray because you trust Jesus

Do you believe that God’s will for your life is better than yours? If we’re praying “your will be done” maybe Jesus will change you. We might begin to realise that where we are is God’s will. Jesus knows what he’s doing. He went to the hardest place to rescue us. Make praying a daily pattern, such as your routine (walking for example). Pray and fast even when you don’t want to. We need to talk to Jesus even when it’s hard. Whatever it is that stops you from talking to God, don’t let it.

Touching Miracles – Luke 8:40-56 – Sermon Notes

Patience is a virtue. Most of us know what it’s like to be impatient. We can sympathize with Jairus. He was a respectable man, a synagogue ruler. We discover that he’s desperate (v41). He was a man with authority whereas Jesus was a carpenter. However he fell at Jesus’ feet as he needed him to do something viral for him. Why was Jairus so desperate? His only daughter was dying (v42). Jesus is the only hope he has for her. He has to come quickly, or it’ll be too late. Jesus is delayed by a sick woman in the crowd.

The miracle of the woman (v43-48)

This woman has been ill for 12 years. She’s squandered her money on doctors and is also desperate. She is miraculously healed. Jesus is aware of what’s happened. He turns round and searches the crowd for who has touched him. Jesus wanted to explain to her that her healing was a result of her faith in him. Identifying herself to Jesus wasn’t an easy thing to do. This woman gets more than she bargained for. She now knows what’s really important. It’s a life-changing relationship with Jesus.

The miracle of the young girl (v49-56)

Imagine the reaction of Jairus to the delay. He’d be frantic. Any doctor would in this situation go straight to the little girl who’s dying. Jesus takes time out in order to speak with this woman. He won’t be hurried and is in control of this situation. Jesus’ comments to Jairus are astonishing (v50). He’s telling Jairus to give more, to take his faith to a deeper level. Even though his daughter is dead, he’s telling him to trust him even more. Jairus had hoped his little girl would be healed, but she was raised from the dead. Jesus said the girl wasn’t dead, but asleep. What he says in verse 54 is a comforting statement. It’s a term of endearment. Death is no more than sleep. For who has the final word? Jesus. Death has no mastery over her. No wonder those around her are astonished.

The miracle for you

What impact should these two miracles have on your life today? What’s true for this sick woman and for Jairus’ daughter can be true for you as well. The sick woman learnt that Jesus is someone she must know. That can be true for us, too. Jairus learnt that Jesus’ way of looking at things is different from ours. Look to Jesus, not to yourself. Jairus’ daughter learnt that death is not the end. Jesus can and does conquer death. If you trust in Jesus, death itself will be just like falling asleep. It’ll bring you into the very presence of Jesus him.

Godly Decisions – Acts 21:1-16 – Sermon Notes

How do you know where God wants you to live? How do you know who God wants you to marry? We can think of God’s plan as a bullseye. We can be afraid that we’ve been picked the wrong path if we don’t find plan A. What are we missing? You’re right to want to please God in the decisions you make, but there might be a healthier way to view God’s guidance.

Luke 24:46-47 summarises the two books Luke wrote. Paul is faced with a dilemma:

Should I stay or should I go?

The disciples pleaded with Paul not to go. Agabus is also opposed to Paul’s decision to go to Jerusalem. At least six different groups of individuals are saying the same thing. Paul’s answer:

Don’t go breaking my heart!

Paul is on one side and a whole group of Christian people on the other. In the end, Paul is undeterred by his friends’ pleas. He is compelled as he is following the task that God has given. The one thing that matters to Paul more than anything is the gospel being preached as Jesus instructed (Luke 24:47). It matters more to him than being in prison, or dying. Were the other Christians wrong? Agabus doesn’t get everything right. They did say Paul would suffer, and he did. Perhaps they were concerned about his welfare and safety. Is that wrong? No. For Paul, he thought it best to obey Jesus’ words. He chose Jerusalem over his own comforts.

How do we make decisions?

We seek wisdom from friends, which can be helpful or unhelpful. Are they pointing you to Jesus? We can ask God for a stamp of approval. Is there anywhere in the Bible that God says he’ll guide you in those ways? These suggestions treat God as a Magic 8 ball. If we view God in that way, we expect an answer. We’re not robots. Our simple human nature is a bit like Adam in the garden of Eden. We like to avoid responsibility in making decisions. We can blame others if things turn out badly.

God is able to speak in whatever way he chooses, and there are occasions where God does speak directly by the Holy Spirit, but it’s not the norm. The primary way that God speaks is through the Bible. There’s nothing new that God needs to say to us. We should turn to the Bible when making decisions.

  • God is sovereign. Whatever decision you’re faced with, nothing is outside of his control. We’re never in plan B. We’re all in his sovereignty.
  • Obedience – we must obey God. Would a decision cause us to sin?
  • Wisdom – we should be wise. Is the decision a wise, God-centred decision?
  • Freedom – there are some things that God hasn’t spoken about in his word, but we should trust him. We don’t need to be anxious.

A better question: is the one thing that matters to you most, what matters to God? Be humble and prioritise the gospel. At the heart of gospel decision making is humility. In the decisions we make, are we prepared to do the same as Paul?

Godly Living – Acts 20:7-38 – Sermon Notes

Verse 32 is key to this passage. Paul commits people that he loves to the word of God’s grace. He’s not leaving them with nothing.

God and his word build Christians up

If we want to become the building God wants us to be, we need to let him tell us where he wants us to be. God’s word shows us how he wants us to be, whether it’s loving our neighbour, or honouring our parents, for example.

God and his word give an inheritance

It’s life forever with him in a perfect world. This is an inheritance for every Christian. God needs to work in the life of someone to bring them to him. Every person in the world has sinned. We’ve all rejected. We’ve all failed to live up to our own standards, let alone God’s. We’re not abandoned and left under judgement. God has acted. He has come to rescue us. Jesus came to live a perfect life and die an unjust death. He died as a substitute. He died in our place. We have an inheritance if we follow him.

A life of love

This passage is a model of what it looks like to follow God (1 Corinthians 11:1). Paul gathers the Ephesian elders together. He implicitly says “imitate me”. The church family in Ephesus is a family that Paul loves dearly. They were to never see him again. Mostly, we see Paul lived a life of gentleness and care. He loves people because he knows how much God loves people. This is a responsibility particularly for leaders of churches, but also for all Christians. We should include everyone when inviting people round, instead of just those we have lots in common with.

A life that takes every opportunity to speak

Paul knows he’s going but wants to make the most of the time he has (v7) and so he talks until midnight. Eutychus falls out of a third storey window. As funny as the story is, imagine if that happened to someone you cared about. Paul is a chosen apostle with unique authority. It’s an incredible miracle. It’s not normal, but it’s another reminder of the authority of Paul’s words, that we can trust what he says. Paul has spent his life modelling that it’s God’s word that builds Christians and gives an inheritance. He models a life that takes every opportunity to speak of God and his word. We should do the same. Aren’t there lots of good ways that we can speak to people of God and his word?

A life that teaches all of God’s word (even the hard bits)

The whole of God’s word is helpful. God wouldn’t have given it to us otherwise. People will come and try to destroy God’s church (v29-31). When we begin to avoid the bits that are hard, that can happen. It’s not loving to avoid difficult conversations. We are to teach all of God’s word. There are plenty of people who say they are Christians but deny God’s word. Paul has told the truth (v26).

A life that reflects what you say

Christians have been labelled as hypocrites for many reasons. Individually and corporately we need to confess when we’ve failed. The difference between being a hypocrite and being an honest Christian is that a hypocrite tries to pretend otherwise. We don’t need to live for money or comfort; we need to live for the inheritance waiting for us. Shouldn’t we love the community in which we live? If this is the most important news in the world, shouldn’t we use what we have now for the benefit of others? Paul knows how much better life in eternity will be. We will find a delight in it, as we’ll be living more for God’s glory as we trust in him. In what small ways can we imitate Paul? We can’t do it alone. We can only do it by God working through us.

The Gospel From Below – Matthew 1:18-25 – Sermon Notes

Matthew shows us how Jesus is fully human and over the course of their story, how Jesus is fully God. Christ is God’s chosen king. He’s a direct descendant of David and Abraham (see 1:1-17). God’s promises are being fulfilled in Jesus. Mary and Joseph were legally committed but not yet married. Joseph didn’t need to be quiet. He could’ve had Mary stoned to death. As far as he knows she has cheated on him with another man, yet he has compassion. Mary has probably told him but why would he believe her?

An angel visits Joseph. It’s not normal. This is an unusual thing because this is God’s plan of salvation for the world. From the beginning of the Bible, sin has always been a problem. This is a long-promised saviour. Joseph responds with amazing obedience. He responds in true faith just as Mary had done.

God is good and people are rubbish

This is a shocking story. This baby comes and God chooses him to be dependent on people. Humans can’t be trusted yet God entrusts Jesus to them. God has chosen to humble himself in human form, utterly dependent on Mary and Joseph to look after him. That is shocking. God chose this way.

The sovereign Lord trusts normal people to bring about his salvation plan for the world

God risks everything by trusting his message of salvation to normal people like us. There is not one person who can save themselves and there’s not one person who Jesus can’t save. We can all be willing to do what he asks. We can do it together as a church family. There is real joy seeing God work despite our failures. God continues to use and trust rubbish people to bring about his good and perfect plans.

The Gospel From Above – John 1:1-18 – Sermon Notes

John’s intention was to focus entirely on Jesus. When we writes these words, he’s an old man. He’s probably the last survivor of the apostles. His purpose in writing this gospel is clear (John 20:30-31).

Who is Jesus?

There’s no doubt that this whole passage is about Jesus, even though his name isn’t mentioned until v17. The opening parallels with Genesis 1. The Hebrew word for ‘Word’ also indicates deed. What God says, he does. The Word is eternal (v2). This passage makes it clear that Jesus has always existed. He is the eternal son of God. He is the creator (v3). When we think of how small the earth is compared to the Sun, it should make us humble and want to worship. Jesus is the uncreated light (v4-5), the light of the world. That is the light that God is shining into our hearts. He’s the source of light and life (v9). At the heart of the Christmas message is the Word became flesh (v14).

Why did he come?

To be light in the darkness (v5). God lives in unapproachable light, but Jesus is God in human form who came and lived among us. The problem is that Jesus said people loved darkness more than light. We don’t like being exposed when we’re wrong. He came to give light to everyone (v9), to give life to all who believe in him (v4), and to live among people and make God known (v14 & 18). What is God like? Look at Jesus. He came to bring God’s grace and truth to us (v17). God’s law shows us our sinfulness, but Jesus came to fulfill the law. He alone can rescue us from our spiritual darkness. Without faith in Jesus, we can’t be accepted by God.

How can we know him?

We need to acknowledge that Jesus is who he says he is. The world doesn’t recognise him, but he’s calling people to recognise who he is. We are to believe in his name. God makes us his children. Having faith means following him. God takes delight in his people. Let’s enter that delight. Let his grace be seen in our lives so that people would be drawn to him and follow him.

Building the Church – Acts 18:18-19:7 – Sermon Notes

The gospel the apostles taught is preserved in Luke’s account. The Holy Spirit they relied on is with every believer. We should have the same confidence. How is the church going to grow? There are three scenes in this passage. We can have full confidence because God is building the church on the foundation of his word.

When Christians feel weak, open God’s word to strengthen one another (18:18-23)

Paul had already spent a year and a half in Corinth. It’s likely he felt weak as God spoke to him in a vision. He’s strengthened by the word that God speaks to him. Why does he take an unusual route? He points the church to God when they feel weak. He uses God’s word to preach the message of the gospel. The church is built as the word spreads widely (19:20). When we feel weak, let’s open God’s word.

When Christians disagree, explain God’s word more accurately to one another (18:24-28)

Apollos appears faultless. He’s mentioned in 1 Corinthians 1:11-12. He speaks eloquently and is very persuasive. The Corinthian church had started to quarrel. Paul isn’t criticising him. It’s God’s word, not engaging speakers that advance the gospel. One godly Christian couple with a Bible have all they need. Who likes to be corrected? Apollos cares more about the gospel than about his own reputation. As we open God’s word with each other, we are participating in a great activity, as we grow as Christians.

When people are confused, teach God’s word until they are clear (19:1-7)

Paul teaches them until they are clear (19:4). He’s so committed to teaching the Ephesians that he remains with them for two years. As Christians we need to rediscover how to disagree well. It seems that the twelve men aren’t Christians when Paul meets them. On hearing the gospel they receive the Holy Spirit. Why does Luke seem to emphasise the gifts of tongues and prophecy? He wants to reassure his readers that they are Christians. The context of which tongues and prophecy happen needs to be understood in terms of 1 Corinthians 12-13. People may believe different things about prophecy. As we talk to each other, have the Bible open. Let’s listen and meet with the Lord about these things.

It’s God’s word, not our experiences that build churches.

Go On Speaking – Acts 18:1-17 – Sermon Notes

It can be hard to keep speaking about Jesus. We can be too busy, or frightened. What if we say the wrong thing? What about hard questions? Life wasn’t so different in the early church. It’s strangely encouraging that even Paul needed God to intervene to encourage him to continue speaking.

Paul is in Corinth on his own and none of his companions are with him. It’s not that different from Athens. It’s a powerful Roman colony. They’re not interested in Paul. It’s a daunting place for Paul to be on his own.

Christianity is the fulfilment of all of God’s promises

Christianity is the continuation of the faith of all Jews everywhere. It’s the completion of the promises the Jewish people were looking forward to. Paul knows that Christianity is a hope for all Jewish people. He’s willing to do whatever is necessary in order to speak in any place about Jesus. God’s promised Messiah was going to be greater than a human king. This has been God’s plan since before the creation of the world. Doesn’t that give us confidence to speak? We have God’s hope for the world to share.

The Lord is the one gathering a people for himself

It’s not just down to Paul, or any person. If you’re a Christian, do you realise that’s a miracle? It should encourage us that it’s not completely up to us, but we need to keep speaking. Paul has proclaimed the gospel and despite opposition, people are becoming Christians. The ruler of the synagogue and his family became Christians. One new people under Jesus Christ. We need to have confidence in him.

The Lord commands us to speak, and promises to be with us

The Lord is faithful to his promises. He uses a Roman non-Christian to protect Paul from harm. Paul is able to stay there for a year and a half. How can we make disciples unless we speak? We should keep on speaking because the hope of Christianity has always been God’s plan.

Missional Life – 1 Peter 5:1-14 – Sermon Notes

We all hope for all kinds of things. Some are good, some aren’t so good. If we’re Christians, God calls us to a different hope. Our hopes are often about our own situations in our lives now. The book of 1 Peter has lots to say about the hope we are called to (1:3-4). Hope is central to this letter. It’s a future hope (v1, 4, 6, 10). The Christian life is one of a living hope, sharing in Jesus’ glory until he returns.

The Christian life can only be explained by this living hope

Live a good life now (2:12) even if it means being hated and accused of being wrong because Jesus is coming back. Our hope isn’t just for now but for the future promised by God. Why would a Christian slave keep working hard? Only if they’ve got a living hope for something more than this life. Why would you go out of your way to show kindness to someone who’s hated you? Only if you have a living hope. It’s a wonderful way of living but it’s still hard. When Jesus comes back he will remake the world as it should be. We don’t deserve to be part of that.

It’s only possible to lead a church in the way Peter describes if you have this living hope. He was one of Jesus’ closest followers. What’s the motivation to be a humble serving church leader? Verse 4. Isn’t it just easier to want an easy life? Peter says to be submissive to church leaders. Humble service is only possible if you have this living hope.

The Christian life is shaped by this living hope

Living a missional life is about remembering that the whole Christian life is lived for the glory of God. That’s what helps us share the good news of Christianity with others. It’s hard (v7). It’s okay to be anxious if we’re taking our anxieties to God because he cares for us. Be self-controlled and alert (v8). The devil wants the pain of suffering to stop people from being Christians. He wants you to keep the fact you’re a Christian secret. The best way to resist him is to meet Christians in local churches. We are to support and challenge each other. We need to be reminded that we’re not alone when we suffer.

Are your choices shaped more and more by your living hope for Jesus’ return in glory, even knowing that this might mean suffering for you? How do you use your time, money and home? Seeing a Christian living with this hope speaks volumes.